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Gamble pays off for Lieberman, who becomes Israeli kingmaker Trash talk, mattress fires and a flying projector: Lane Kiffin's year at Tennessee

Gamble pays off for Lieberman, who becomes Israeli kingmakerThe veteran Israeli politician Avigdor Lieberman took the political gamble of his life when he spurned his mentor, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and forced an unprecedented repeat election. With neither Netanyahu's Likud nor former military chief Benny Gantz's centrist Blue and White party forecast to secure a majority in the 120-seat parliament without his support, Lieberman has emerged as the election's true winner — the one most likely to dictate the makeup of the next government. Lieberman passed up the post of defense minister in Netanyahu's government following April's election and refused to join the new coalition because of what he said was the excessive influence it granted to ultra-Orthodox Jewish parties.


Lane Kiffin's one season in Knoxville was one of the wildest in recent memory. A decade later, those involved remember the highs, the lows and the unbelievable.
California Bans State-Sponsored Travel to Iowa over Refusal to Provide Medicaid Coverage for Gender-Reassignment Surgeries In video chat, Gordon says he'll play 'somewhere'

California Bans State-Sponsored Travel to Iowa over Refusal to Provide Medicaid Coverage for Gender-Reassignment SurgeriesCalifornia added an eleventh state to its travel blacklist on Friday, banning state-sponsored travel to Iowa over that state's refusal to cover gender-transition surgeries under its Medicaid program.California attorney general Xavier Becerra announced the decision to add Iowa to the travel-ban list, which takes effect October 4 and means public employees and college students will not be able to travel to Iowa on the taxpayer's dime.In May, Iowa governor Kim Reynolds signed a law blocking Medicaid from paying for gender-reassignment surgeries despite the state Supreme Court's ruling earlier this year in favor of charging taxpayers for the procedures. Gender identity is a protected characteristic under Iowa's Civil Rights Act."The Iowa Legislature has reversed course on what was settled law under the Iowa Civil Rights Act, repealing protections for those seeking gender-affirming healthcare," Becerra said in a statement. "California has taken an unambiguous stand against discrimination and government actions that would enable it."California's travel blacklist stems from a 2016 law allowing the Golden State to ban state travel to other U.S. states that roll back protections for LGBT citizens. Texas, Oklahoma, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Kentucky are also on the list.


In a video chat with his Instagram followers on Tuesday, Chargers running back holdout Melvin Gordon said it would be "a waste of talent" if he didn't play this season.
Andrew Yang’s Dumb Gimmick Stepped on His Own Important Message Curry commits to Olympics: 'That is the plan'

Andrew Yang’s Dumb Gimmick Stepped on His Own Important MessagePhoto Illustration by The Daily Beast/Photo by Jayme Gershen/GettyAndrew Yang has been my favorite Democrat to watch this election cycle, partly because he’s the candidate I would most like to be friends with. That’s why I was so disappointed to see him resort to a cheap stunt during last week’s debate. I assumed that having earned his way into the first debate where all the candidates would share the same stage at the same time, Yang would seize this moment to explain the core issue that has propelled his candidacy. In case you missed it (and you wouldn’t have seen it during the debate!), Yang’s fundamental message is that a lot of working-class Americans have been left behind, and the culprit is automation. This problem, Yang insists, is going to get much more pervasive. Like the Industrial Revolution, it will lead to tremendous dislocation and disruption. To manage this inevitable transformation, Yang proposes a universal basic income (UBI) of $1,000 a month, an amount specifically chosen to be big enough to mitigate the harm without being so big as to disincentivize work. Indeed, Yang argues that his “freedom dividend” could actually liberate us to pursue our inventions, passions, and dreams. The brilliance here is that Yang frames what might otherwise be seen as a radical progressive idea in language that sounds good to conservative ears. Democrats, Beware of Andrew Yang’s Insane Vision for AmericaBut instead of telling this (admittedly longer) story, Yang chose to turn his opening debate statement into a raffle where 10 families will win a “freedom dividend” of $1,000 a month for a year.  By turning his big idea into a sort of game, Yang doesn’t just skip over the seriousness of a looming automation dystopia—he actually trivializes it. What is more, the idea of giving away money based on luck or need (it’s not actually clear how winners will be determined) actually steps on Yang’s own messaging. That’s because Yang carefully avoids framing UBI as a giveaway (indeed, to qualify for the check, you’d have to opt out of welfare payments). Instead, he sells it as something you’ve earned—like Social Security—by virtue of being a “citizen of the richest, most advanced country in the world.”   So why would an obviously smart entrepreneur squander the best chance he might ever have to make his substantive argument to a large TV audience? According to Politico, the idea helped Yang “raise $1 million in the 72 hours since the debate and collect more than 450,000 email addresses from people who entered the online raffle…” Once you view the idea through the prism of list acquisition, rather than traditional message delivery, you begin to see the method to the madness. This, of course, raises legal questions. FEC experts seem to see this as problematic and dubious, though there is a general sense that nothing will be done to stop it. We live in a world where a foreign government providing opposition research to a candidate doesn’t necessarily qualify as “a thing of value,” and where using campaign funds to ostensibly pay voters can be seen as mere campaign advertising. It also raises a practical question: Where does this end?In recent years, we have seen the proliferation of cloying candidates begging us to “visit my website” or to text such-and-such message to such-and-such number. As far as I can tell, though, this is the first time audiences have been invited to participate by virtue of being given the chance to win cash. And since it has apparently worked, I’m worried that everyone else will get in on the act. That means we can expect to see more elites exploiting their positions of influence and undermining their credibility—all in the service of shameless self-promotion. I, for one, have had enough of that. Want to win a copy of my latest eBook? Sign up for my email newsletter at www.mattklewis.com. Terms and conditions may apply!Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


In an interview with ESPN's Rachel Nichols, Warriors guard Stephen Curry said he's committed to playing for Team USA in his first Olympic Games next summer in Tokyo.
Sheriff indicted for plotting to kill deputy who had tape of his 'racially offensive' remarks Mike Yaz: Homer in Fenway debut 'super special'

Sheriff indicted for plotting to kill deputy who had tape of his 'racially offensive' remarksA North Carolina sheriff was indicted for obstruction of justice for allegedly plotting to kill one of his deputies.


Giants outfielder Mike Yastrzemski, the grandson of Red Sox great Carl Yastrzemski, said playing at Fenway on Tuesday "isn't just special for me. This is special for anyone who saw my grandfather play."
20 arrested, 18 charged in Minneapolis beatings Source: Ingram, Ball full participants in workouts

20 arrested, 18 charged in Minneapolis beatingsMinneapolis police chief, assault victim talk to Fox News about arrests in downtown beatings; Matt Finn reports.


Pelicans forward Brandon Ingram and guard Lonzo Ball have been full participants in the team's voluntary offseason workouts in New Orleans, a source told ESPN. Neither player has been restricted by the injuries that shut them down last season.


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Algeria Views and Opinions
 
Why U.S. Engagement Policy Is The Correct One

Invariably, when one thinks of the efficacy of a nation’s military, the mind’s eye is drawn to the ability of that country to deliver a \"warhead onto the forehead\" of their enemies. Indeed, owing to the Pentagon’s slick packaging of the First Gulf War, modern conflict, in the American mind, became synonymous with high-tech toys, grainy videos of successful missile shots, and a quick resolution of hostilities.

Living Wages Are A Global Problem

The recent protests for an increased minimum wage are part of a larger global protest. The purpose is the same for low wage earners all over the world; increase wages to match the cost of living, and allow workers to form unions if desired and needed. The global protest has gained media attention all over the world, but critics claim that is the only accomplishment the movement will have.

Ukraine: Not What It Seems

After tense days of fighting this week, people in Ukraine are mourning the dead and celebrating the removal of President Victor Yanukovych from power. The final struggle that began on February 18, was the bloodiest endured by the protesters of Euromaidan. By February 22 the fighting was over.

In a Five to Four Decision, Voting Just Got Harder

In a five to four decision along party lines, the Supreme Court ruled on the controversial Shelby County v. Holder case. The ruling, believed by many sets the nation back decades in Civil Rights, while others see it as the fault of Congress dropping the ball on updating the act when it should have years ago.

Coup Or Civil War In Egypt

The day after new protests erupted in Egypt the military in a show of support presented an ultimatum to Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood-led government. Morsi was to step down from power and meet all of the demands of the Egyptian people, or face being removed by the military on Wednesday. As the ultimatum deadline draws closer in Egypt, Morsi refuses to leave, insisting that parliamentary elections are needed before he should be removed, and that he doesn't have permission from the United States to remove himself from power. Most recently he stated he will pay with his life to preserve the sanctity of the ballot box.

 

 
 
 
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